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CRAWL NaNoWriMo Academy Crawl
#1
The link for the crawl as a google doc can be found here




Welcome to the Nanowrimo Academy Crawl.
 

Do a one minute word sprint as you double check your bags.
 

Do you have everything? Your computer? Your words? Your pen? Your notebook? You’re going to need it. You catch sight of the brochure as you stuff last minute items into your bag. Do a two minute word sprint as you read it.
 

“Welcome to the Nanowrimo academy,” It reads. “Here you’ll attend classes such as ‘My Plot Ran Away- What Do I DO?,’ ‘The Types of Plot Bunnies’, ‘Founding of Nanowrimo’, and more. During this, you’ll also work on your novel!
Do a five minute word sprint as you drive to the academy.
 

The academy isn’t that far away, so you’re able to get there pretty quick!
Do a ten minute sprint.
  • If you get under 200 words, you’ve just been admitted to the ranks of the November Academy, out of secondary school.
  • If you get under 400 words, you’re here for your second year.
  • If you get under 450 words, you’re here for your third year.
  • If you get under or over 500 words, you’re here for your fourth and final year.  
 

Write two hundred words.
 

You receive your schedule as you walk in the door.
First years: Your schedule looks as follows: Characterization V.1, Writing Techniques V.1, The Types of Plot Bunnies V.1, Founding of Nanowrimo V.1, Lunch, How to Ignore Your Inner Editor V.1, Reaching 50K V.1, Free-write/Study hall V.1
Second years: Your schedule looks as follows:Characterization V.2, Writing Techniques V.2, The Types of Plot Bunnies V.2, Founding of Nanowrimo V.2, Lunch, How to Ignore Your Inner Editor V.2, Reaching 50K V.2, Gym, Free-write/Study hall V.2
Third years, your schedule looks as follows: Characterization V.3, Writing Techniques V.3, The Types of Plot Bunnies V.3, Founding of Nanowrimo V.3, Lunch, How to Ignore Your Inner Editor V.13, Reaching 50K V.3, Gym, Art, Free-write/Study hall V.3
Fourth years, your schedule is as follows: Characterization V.4, Writing Techniques V.4, The Types of Plot Bunnies V.4, Founding of Nanowrimo V.4, Lunch, How to Ignore Your Inner Editor V.4, Reaching 50K V.4, Gym, Art, How to Over Achieve, Free-write/Study hall V.4
 

You check out the dorms, and receive your key.
  • If you’re a year one, your dorm is on the first floor, so you don’t have to go very far. Word war for five minutes with someone as you reach your dorm. It doesn’t matter if you win or lose.
  • If you’re in your second year, your dorm is on the second floor, so you have to climb up a flight of stairs. Word war for ten minutes with someone as you reach your dorm. It doesn’t matter if you win or lose.
  • If you’re onto your third year, you get stuck with a room on the third floor. You get stuck with three flights of stairs. Word war for ten minutes.
    • If you win, you get an awesome roommate who helps you carry your stuff up.
    • If you lose, you have to lug all of your stuff up. Write another 100 words.
  • If you’re on to your fourth year, you’re on the top floor. Word war for fifteen minutes.
    • If you lose you drop your stuff on the second floor and have to clean up broken glass. Write an extra 300 words.
    • If you win do nothing else.
 

You decide to take a nap before exploring the rest of campus, and accidentally sleep longer than you were supposed to. Roll a die.
  • If you’re at your first year, write 10 times that number.
  • If you’re in your second, write 20 times that number.
  • If you’re in your third, write 100 times that number.
  • If you’re in your fourth, write 1000 times that number.
 

You realize that you slept through the night, but thankfully your roommate wakes you up. As you hurriedly get ready, write:
  • One hundred words for year one
  • Two hundred words for year two
  • Three hundred words for year three
  • Five hundred words for year four
 

You rush into your respective classes.
  • Year one: Your professor smiles at you, and says “It’s okay, it’s the first day. Go ahead and take a seat.” You slip into your seat and he starts passing out the class materials. You get a book with a character on the front. The professor begins speaking, “Characters are one of the most important things in fiction. It’s important to know your characters past, even if you don’t explain it to the reader. I want you to write for five minutes about your character’s past.”
  • Year two: You manage to make it in on time, and your books are sitting on your desk. You shove them into your bag, and listen as the professor begins speaking. “It’s important to convey emotions and facts about your character without stating them. Show, don’t tell, is especially important here. Make a list of your character’s dominant traits. Use this list to write a six hundred word scene where your characters emotions come out, without you saying ‘s/he/they is mad/sad/etc.”
  • Year three: You stumble into class on time, and the professor glares, but says nothing as he deposits a paper on your desk. “We need to know about our characters,” He says “To make them seem real to the reader. Dialogue is an excellent way to get to know your character. Write for ten minutes while you or someone else has a revealing conversation with your character. This should show something about their emotions.”
  • Year four: You arrive ten minutes late, and the professor starts yelling at you. You cower and suddenly the professor stops “I want you to write one thousand words about how a character could grow from an experience like this.” He walks away, and starts lecturing the class.
    • Passing period is a busy time. Take ten minutes to do a word war.
      • If you lose write however many words you lost by.
      • If you win write the amount of words the loser wrote.
 

You duck into writing techniques on time, and find a seat.
  • Year one: Your teacher for this class is an old looking lady named Ms. Plum. She smiles at you as you sit down and immediately starts talking to the class. “Welcome to Writing Techniques!  Today we’ll be brainstorming what makes other people’s writing so lovely! Take out your pens and paper- no dastardly technology here!” Some of the students sneak onto their phones to type a list, but others pull out notebooks. “Write down a list of things that you like in others writing.”
  • Year two: You sit down in your seat, but thankfully don’t have Ms.Plum this year. Instead you have a young teacher who doesn’t say anything besides “Write for ten minutes in the style of your favorite author- I have to text my boyfriend.” She scowls and sits at her desk. You don’t really know why they hired her.
  • Year three: Your teacher is mumbling to the whiteboard, and you miss most of what he says besides “Some writing techniques can be found at http://thewritelife.com/5-powerful-writing-techniques/. Try to write using one of the tips here for ten minutes.
  • Year four: Your teacher is missing. You wait fifteen minutes while taking place in a word war before walking out of class. Someone notifies the office, but they don’t have anyone to spare. You wander out to the gardens, where someone smiles and invites you to write with them. You write 1,500 hundred more words.
    • Passing period is a busy time. Take ten minutes to do a word war.
      • If you lose write however many words you lost by.
      • If you win write the amount of words the loser wrote times two.
 

You wander into your plot bunny class, only to be stopped and directed into a line. The teacher has decided to take you down to the forums to get your own plot bunny! http://nanowrimo.org/forums/games-divers...stination/
If you can’t find one there, go ahead and write yourself up a plot bunny in 50 word or more.
  • Year one: Plot bunny in tow, your teacher leads you back to the classroom. “Now that you have new ideas,” he says, “write away with your plot bunny. Write for five minutes.”
  • Year two: Once you get back to your classroom, the teacher starts talking about the different types of plot bunnies. Halfway through, he starts ranting about The Lop Earred Sitting Around Talking Shorthair “It’s evil!” He proclaims, “Your character just sits down and does nothing! NOTHING! You write maybe five hundred words and he’s just TALKING!” In an attempt to tune him out, you write two hundred words.
  • Year three: When you get back, your plot bunny runs away. Write 500 words while you find it hiding behind a plant.
  • Year four: Your teacher has a love-stricken look in her eyes eyes as she starts talking about the Luuuuuv bunny. “He’s just so lovely!” She says, smiling “Invading your novel, and your life and oooh!” The person next to you tires of her rambling and asks “Want to write a thousand words with me?” You counter with “I’ll do that times three, and a ten minute word war.” (3,000 words and a 10 minute word war.) “Deal!” She smiles and you start writing.
 

Founding of Nanowrimo is canceled due to technical errors. You stare in wonder as pencils rain from the sky, and run outside to catch one. Only, the pencils have numbers on them. Depending on the pencil you catch, you have to write that amount of words. Generate a number between 1 and 10000. Write that many words.
 

You get to lunch, and a friend challenges you to write eighty words in a minute. Repeat until you can, then take a break. You deserve it!
 

You go from Lunch to Ignoring Your Inner Editor.  Your teacher seems insistent upon nonsense. He blathers gibberish, spews adverbs, and generally does a great job of ignoring his inner editor. He doesn’t tell you how to do it however, and you’re stuck writing and trying.
  • Year one: Write one hundred words without hitting the backspace key. Everytime you hit it, add another fifty words.
  • Year two: Write two hundred words without hitting the backspace key. Everytime you hit it, add another fifty words.
  • Year three: Write five hundred words without hitting the backspace key. Everytime you hit it, add another fifty words.
  • Year four: Write 1,500 hundred words without hitting the backspace key. Everytime you hit it, add another two hundred words.  
 

After Ignoring Your Inner Editor, you head to Reaching 50K. The teacher’s desperately trying to prepare for her next hour, so she just assigns you words prints to build your stamina.
  • Year one: Sprint to 1000 words!
  • Year two: Sprint to 2000 words!
  • Year three: Sprint to 3000 words!
  • Year four: Sprint to 10000 words!
 

If you’re in year one SKIP THIS.
If not, you rush to gym where the teacher orders you to flex your writing muscles and write 1000 words in twelve minutes. Repeat until you can.  After that, he scowls and orders you to write 5% of what you’ve written in this crawl.
 

Passing period is a busy time. Take ten minutes to do a word war.
  • If you lose write however many words you lost by.
  • If you win write the amount of words the loser wrote.
  • If you’re in years one or two SKIP THIS.
 

If not, you rush to Art. You take five minutes to look at the artisans thread, and then race 3% of your WHOLE word count because you’re so inspired.
  • If you’re in year one, two, or three, SKIP THIS.
 

You rush to the last real class of the day ‘How to be an overachiever’ and frown. This class is scary. The teacher immediately orders you to do a fifty-headed hydra, followed by a 1K in 10 minutes. After that, he declares that you’ve just warmed up and tells you to write 5K in an hour. As you pray for the test to get out, he delivers the final blow. Write 5% of your total for the crawl or write 10K. The choice is yours. Just as you think you're free, they scowl and order you to stay another ten minutes. They give you the 3% challenge. Then they give you a 10% of everything in the crawl. And finally, they smile slowly, and pair you up against a wrimo named HiddenStorys for a word war. Try to write more than 10,500 words in ten minutes to finally escape the class. If you don't, write 10K more before running.
 

Passing period is a busy time. Take ten minutes to do a word war.
  • If you lose write however many words you lost by.
  • If you win write the amount of words the loser wrote.
 

Exhausted from a busy day, you get to study hall and write one thousand more words followed by a ten minute word war.   You head back to your dorm room and sprint 200 words in the time it takes you to get there.
 

You fall exhausted into bed, and dream of writing 900 words.
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